An analysis of the novels by dostoevsky

The Landlady as devoid of a social message. In Dostoyevsky joined a group of young intellectuals, led by Mikhail Petrashevsky, which met to discuss literary and political issues. In the reactionary political climate of mid-nineteenth-century Russia, such groups were illegal, and in the members of the so-called Petrashevsky Circle were arrested and charged with subversion. Dostoyevsky and several of his associates were imprisoned and sentenced to death.

An analysis of the novels by dostoevsky

But they are not easy to describe. They are always set in California, they are always first-person narratives, the narrator is someone who looks and sounds—well, like Brautigan, one has to suppose.

They do seem to understand one another pretty well, and thus come to live in a kind of Brautigan subculture into which recognizable America—fearful suspicious, apologetic, hair-trigger violent—obtrudes only occasionally.

One mark of their separateness that a reader is first bothered by and then, after a while, becomes rather attached to, is the use of an occasional phrase in what Gogol would call its "hemorrhoidal" sense—all-purpose, asyntactical, repetitious, skewball. The people of In Watermelon Sugar live near a watermelon sugar factory, one of whose byproducts is a flammable something called watermelontrout oil.

It seems to me a fable, but also a nightmare, of innocence. Our nameless narrator is a sweet, simple, well-meaning person; practically the first thing he tells us is that he has a gentle life.

Sometimes he is a writer, sometimes he is a sculptor: But he is troubled by all sorts of violence, some actual, some recollected. And worse An analysis of the novels by dostoevsky all these for our narrator, though less dramatic, is the basic problem of the book, Margaret and Pauline.

The problem is simply that it used to be Margaret who slept with the narrator, and now it is Pauline. She takes to hanging around inBOIL and his gang of nasties; then, when, out of bravado, they cut themselves to pieces with jackknives, Margaret goes off and hangs herself from an apple tree.

They bury her, after the traditional watermelon sugar fashion, in a lighted glass coffin set in the river bed, and the book ends with preparations for the traditional funeral dance, a waltz in the trout hatchery. The end of inBOIL and cronies comes about when they understand the principles of the place better than those who live there, and prove the point by slashing themselves thumbs, noses, ears, eyes gorily to pieces.

The Possessed

Probably this is because it feels like a bigger book. I found it more diffuse and episodic, a little more forced in some of its fun, a little more disposed to rely on obscenity for easy effects. Without any of the structure of In Watermelon Sugarit is wilder and more fantastic in its use of language, more eloquent and various in its accounts of some very quirky people—a kind of visionary comic-book apocalypse about fresh-water Americans and their nature.

The problem here is simply that, being unsure of itself, it tries too hard. As a matter of fact, there is some reason to feel that, despite publication dates, The Abortion: It is a good deal less grotesque and fantastic than its forerunners, a good deal less ambitious as well. The narrator of The Abortiononce again nameless, is a nice earnest simple young man who works in a library.

But it is an odd library, since it only takes in books that people have written and never gives them out, yet requires the librarian to be available twenty-four hours a day. Irresistibly, inconceivably, alluring Vida Kramar brings in a book she has written in order to explain how uncomfortable she feels in her much-to-provocative body.

Being smashingly attractive is a hard problem for her. With the help of Foster, a diamond in the rough, they take a plane to San Diego, a bus to Tijuana, and then. What makes the situation go is its radical instability. Our hero is presented as such a helpless innocent, Vida is so frantically desirable to all passing males, and the situation is so plainly fraught with the possibilities of hideous misfortune that one is spooked on every page by phantoms of multiple catastrophe.

But, like all other Brautigan innocents, this pair seems to enjoy a special immunity. Evil quietly evaporates around them, and none of the hideous destinies to which Candide heroes are traditionally prone actually befalls them.

The librarian does indeed get a nasty jolt on his return to San Francisco, but Vida and Foster are confident the change will be good for him, and, like parents with a scared, backward child, they manuever him into a new role that leaves him quite happy.

It is a solution open to the same kind of sardonic ambiguity that marked In Watermelon Sugar. Brautigan is a much clumsier artist than I think him to be, he wants that fact to trouble the reader at least some.

The surfaces of the new book are a good deal less skewed than those of the previous two; it has none of those fey watermelons, trouts, and verbal knots in the grain of the narrative.

We drove down Divisadero and saw a man washing the windows of a funeral parlor with a garden hose. He was spraying the hose against the second-floor windows. It was not a normal thing to see, so early in the morning.

The country down that way is pretty nothing and not worth describing. Vida looked out the window at what is not worth describing, but even more so and done in cold cement freeway language. There is a touch of the cunning and tricksy about these jokes; one feels a deliberate element in their simplicity, so that the narrators seems already to have settled into his destined role as campus character.

It would be too much to ask of Mr. He leaves us the possibility of irony; nailing it down explicitly would narrow, not widen, his effect. But the things he makes can and must involve large or trifling attitudes, maybe not toward people I think Brautigan is too modern to care a damn about peoplebut toward the language and vision that are his special gift.

The Possessed Analysis - benjaminpohle.com

But Brautigan has done too much in the genuinely imaginative, powerfully controlled way of vision to be accepted readily as an artificer of the country cute. Richard Brautigan; The Abortion:Among Soviet critics, Crime and Punishment fared the best of any of Dostoevsky's novels, because it lends itself better than any other to the view that it is an attack on the evils of capitalist society-- poverty, recognition of birth or class rather than ability, and so on.

Who will be the Pulitzer Prize Winner for Fiction? April 5, The Pulitzer Prizes will be announced April 18 at 3pm ET.

An analysis of the novels by dostoevsky

Because the names of the finalists are not released ahead of time, the winner is a surprise every year. The Theme of Demons By Bob Morley Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel Demons is a piece that observes Russian ideals during the 's.

A background of Dostoevsky is .

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Demons (pre-reform Russian: Бѣсы; post-reform Russian: Бесы, tr. Bésy; sometimes also called The Possessed or The Devils) is a novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, first published in the journal The Russian Messenger in –2.

The Outsider () is one of the best known existential novels, and Albert Camus's early attempt to grapple with absurdism, and relay it in an abstract, accessible form.

An analysis of the novels by dostoevsky

The philosophical ruminations are embodied by. In Russia, the novels of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, particularly Crime and Punishment () and The Brothers Karamazov (), revealed a world of paradox, alienation, and loss of identity, prophetic of the major tragic themes of the 20th.

Major works and their characteristics. Dostoyevsky is best known for his novella Notes from the Underground and for four long novels.

Fyodor Dostoevsky - Wikipedia